Timothy Tuck

Stained Glass Window - Woman annointed the feet of Jesus

 

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ara Benetowa discovered that the Kaneh-Bosm or Cannabis is mentioned 5 times in the Old Testament. The first occurrence appears in the Holy Anointing Oil as Calamus, (Exodus 30:23).  "Sara argued that the translation of Calamus was a mistranslation which occurred in the oldest Bible the “Septuagint” and the mistranslation was copied in later versions.”
 

 

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he Exodus 30:23 reference refers to sweet Calamus.  If you look at this in the Strong’s concordance where they spell this as qaneh rather than kaneh, they pronounce this as Kaw-Naw, a reed, calamus, and cane are listed as possible translations.  The term sweet used in Exodus 30:23 in Hebrew is Bosem.  According to the Webster’s New World Hebrew Dictionary, Bosem is perfume; scent.  The Concordance: the Hebrew is Bosem #1314, fragrance, by impl. spicery; also the balsam plant:—-smell, spice, sweet (odour).
 

 

  - If you actually buy the Calamus translation for the Holy Oil, then you assume that God specified in Exodus 30:23 a drug commonly known as herbal Ecstasy.  Calamus contains an ingredient called asarone.  This is a hallucinogen which is metabolized in the liver as trimethoxyamphetamine which is known as herbal ecstasy.  The Middle Eastern version of this plant is far more toxic than its North American Cousin.  This is deadly to flies and other insects.

 

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n some Bibles sweet calamus is translated as aromatic or fragrant Cane.  It is where the bosem is fused to the word kaneh or qaneh that the cannabis translation becomes apparent.  So then to pronounce this we have kaw-naw-bosem, and is spelled in English qaneh-bosem or kaneh-bosem.  

 

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n 1936, Sara Benetowa, later Known as Sula Benet, an etymologist from the Institute of Anthropological Sciences, in Warsaw wrote a treatise, “Tracing One Word Through Different Languages”. This was a study on the word Cannabis, based on a study of the oldest Hebrew texts.  Although the word cannabis was thought to be of Scythian origin, Benet’s research showed it had an earlier root in the Semitic Languages such as Hebrew. Benet demonstrated that the ancient Hebrew word for Cannabis is Kaneh-Bosem.
 

 

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he also did another study called Early Diffusion and Folk Uses of Hemp.  On page 44, she states, “The sacred character of hemp in biblical times is evident from Exodus 30:23, where Moses was instructed by God to anoint the meeting tent and all of its furnishings with specially prepared oil, containing hemp.”
 

 

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n page 41 Sula Benet writes, “In the course of time, the two words kaneh and bosem were fused into one, kanabos or kannabus known to us from the Mishna”. According to the Webster’s New World Hebrew Dictionary, page 607 the Hebrew word for hemp is kanabos.

 

 
In 1936, Sara Benetowa, later Known as Sula Benet, an etymologist from the Institute of Anthropological Sciences, in Warsaw wrote a treatise, “Tracing One Word Through Different Languages”. This was a study on the word Cannabis, based on a study of the oldest Hebrew texts.  Although the word cannabis was thought to be of Scythian origin, Benet’s research showed it had an earlier root in the Semitic Languages such as Hebrew. Benet demonstrated that the ancient Hebrew word for Cannabis is Kaneh-Bosem.

She also did another study called Early Diffusion and Folk Uses of Hemp.  On page 44, she states, “The sacred character of hemp in biblical times is evident from Exodus 30:23, where Moses was instructed by God to anoint the meeting tent and all of its furnishings with specially prepared oil, containing hemp.”

On page 41 Sula Benet writes, “In the course of time, the two words kaneh and bosem were fused into one, kanabos or kannabus know to us from the Mishna”. According to the Webster’s New World Hebrew Dictionary, page 607 the Hebrew word for hemp is kanabos.
 

Years Later:

In 1980, a wave of interest in Benet’s work prompted numerous etymologists to agree with Benet’s reinterpretation of the word qaneh-bosm in Exodus. That year, scholars at Jerusalem Hebrew University confirmed her work, noting that the qaneh-bosm was mistranslated in the King James version of Exodus 30:23 as calamus (Latimer, 1988).  That same year, Weston La Barre also confirmed Benet’s work, noting further that “the term kaneh-bosm occurs as early as both the Aramaic and the Hebrew versions of the Old Testament, hemp being used for rope in Solomon’s temple and in priestly robes, as well as carried in Biblical caravans”.


Was Our Savior a Pot Head?

A recent archeological expedition to Israel uncovered scrolls that appear to depict the story of Jesus’ crucifixion. On one of the scrolls is a sketch that shows a man, thought to be Jesus, smoking from a pipe. Below the drawing is the Hebrew word “kineboisin”, which translates to cannabis.

Dr. Isaac Cohen, president of the South Israel Archaeological Society, believes that this is an extremely significant discovery for the theological community. He described the discovery as “a finding that could change the way many perceive the world.” Cannabis is known to have been smoked thousands of years before Jesus’ time, but this is the first evidence to show that Jesus himself may have used the plant.

Not only could this mean that Christian fundamentalist may ease up on their firm stance against the use of marijuana, but they may actually begin to promote its use for an enhanced religious experience. It is the Christian belief that Christ’s followers should emulate him. If Jesus smoked weed, then why shouldn’t everyone else?  [Editor's note:  Normally we like to reference the original study, we are still looking for it.]
 

The holy anointing oil (Hebrew: שמן המשחה shemen ha-mishchah, "oil of anointing") formed an integral part of the ordination of the priesthood and the High Priest as well as in the consecration of the articles of the Tabernacle(Exodus 30:26) and subsequent temples in Jerusalem. The primary purpose of anointing with the holy anointing oil was to cause the anointed persons or objects to become qodesh, or "most holy" (Exodus 30:29).

Originally, the oil was used exclusively for the priests and the Tabernacle articles but was later extended to include prophets and kings (I Samuel 10:1). It was forbidden to be used on an outsider (Exodus 30:33) or to be used on the body of any common persons (Ex. 30:32a) and the Israelites were forbidden to duplicate any like it for themselves (Ex. 30:32b).

We aren't going to promise that you will be able to walk on water but you never know what might happen.

Should Christians use anointing oil today? There is nothing in Scripture that commands or even suggests that we should use similar oil today, but neither is there anything to forbid it.

The anointing oil used by Jesus and his disciples contained an ingredient called kaneh-bosem which has since been identified as cannabis extract. Jesus was almost certainly a cannabis user and an early proponent of the medicinal properties of the drug

Jeremy Kigar woke up in the Emergency Room of the hospital where he worked. Tests revealed that Jeremy had an advanced brain tumor.  The tumor began shrinking after ingesting cannabis oil.

Phyto-Cannabinoids are from the plant world and the Cannabis plant makes 100's of them...

The Bible says Jesus performed miracles healing the sick and even helping restore sight. We've been blind for many years of the Medicinal value of Cannabis. Rick Simpson has made quite a name for his use of Hemp Oil. We know Cannabis and hemp are some of the most valuable plants there is. We've had it wrong for a very long time but God at least got this one right.

We have spent considerable time to source our ingredients. We seek only those who practice sustainable organic farming. We only use the highest quality ingredient while staying 100% true to the original biblical recipe.

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Holy Christ Oil

"Cannabis has a very rich history of medicinal use that dates back thousands of years and across many cultures.."