Displaying items by tag: Biblical Verse

 
In 1936, Sara Benetowa, later Known as Sula Benet, an etymologist from the Institute of Anthropological Sciences, in Warsaw wrote a treatise, “Tracing One Word Through Different Languages”. This was a study on the word Cannabis, based on a study of the oldest Hebrew texts.  Although the word cannabis was thought to be of Scythian origin, Benet’s research showed it had an earlier root in the Semitic Languages such as Hebrew. Benet demonstrated that the ancient Hebrew word for Cannabis is Kaneh-Bosem.

She also did another study called Early Diffusion and Folk Uses of Hemp.  On page 44, she states, “The sacred character of hemp in biblical times is evident from Exodus 30:23, where Moses was instructed by God to anoint the meeting tent and all of its furnishings with specially prepared oil, containing hemp.”

On page 41 Sula Benet writes, “In the course of time, the two words kaneh and bosem were fused into one, kanabos or kannabus know to us from the Mishna”. According to the Webster’s New World Hebrew Dictionary, page 607 the Hebrew word for hemp is kanabos.
 

Years Later:

In 1980, a wave of interest in Benet’s work prompted numerous etymologists to agree with Benet’s reinterpretation of the word qaneh-bosm in Exodus. That year, scholars at Jerusalem Hebrew University confirmed her work, noting that the qaneh-bosm was mistranslated in the King James version of Exodus 30:23 as calamus (Latimer, 1988).  That same year, Weston La Barre also confirmed Benet’s work, noting further that “the term kaneh-bosm occurs as early as both the Aramaic and the Hebrew versions of the Old Testament, hemp being used for rope in Solomon’s temple and in priestly robes, as well as carried in Biblical caravans”.


Was Our Savior a Pot Head?

A recent archeological expedition to Israel uncovered scrolls that appear to depict the story of Jesus’ crucifixion. On one of the scrolls is a sketch that shows a man, thought to be Jesus, smoking from a pipe. Below the drawing is the Hebrew word “kineboisin”, which translates to cannabis.

Dr. Isaac Cohen, president of the South Israel Archaeological Society, believes that this is an extremely significant discovery for the theological community. He described the discovery as “a finding that could change the way many perceive the world.” Cannabis is known to have been smoked thousands of years before Jesus’ time, but this is the first evidence to show that Jesus himself may have used the plant.

Not only could this mean that Christian fundamentalist may ease up on their firm stance against the use of marijuana, but they may actually begin to promote its use for an enhanced religious experience. It is the Christian belief that Christ’s followers should emulate him. If Jesus smoked weed, then why shouldn’t everyone else?  [Editor's note:  Normally we like to reference the original study, we are still looking for it.]
 
Published in Biblical References

Young Women of Jerusalem

6 Who is this sweeping in from the wilderness
    like a cloud of smoke?
Who is it, fragrant with myrrh and frankincense
    and every kind of spice?
Look, it is Solomon’s carriage,
    surrounded by sixty heroic men,
    the best of Israel’s soldiers.

Published in Biblical References

24 Thou hast brought me no sweet cane with money, neither hast thou filled me with the fat of thy sacrifices: but thou hast made me to serve with thy sins, thou hast wearied me with thine iniquities.

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4:14. Spikenard and saffron, sweet cane and cinnamon, with all the trees of Libanus, myrrh and aloes with all the chief perfumes.

 

The reference to sweet cane is actually a reference to Cannabis

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19 Dan and Javan paid for your wares, traversing back and forth. Wrought iron, cassia, and cane were among your merchandise.

 

The reference to Cane is referring to Cannabis.

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Holy Christ Oil

"Cannabis has a very rich history of medicinal use that dates back thousands of years and across many cultures.."